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Biochemistry: Journals & Databases

Some key databases for biochemistry

Search a range of article databases to find articles on a topic, for example

Assess your findings

Evaluating and thinking critically about sources of information are important skills to develop and apply while undertaking research.

Not all information is reliable and appropriate for academic work, and not all information is relevant to your particular topic.

You should challenge and reflect on information that you find; don’t just accept everything you read.

Work through this tutorial to develop your skills in evaluating information that you find online:

What the CRAPP Tutorial

Or apply these terms to assess if the information you have found answers your research question.

Currency

Reliability

Authority

Purpose/Point of view

Work through this tutorial to develop your skills in evaluating information that you find online:

SIFT - Evaluating Information Tutorial

Even though the library databases are good sources of information, we still need to evaluate that information before we decide to use it. You can do this by asking the following questions:

  • Is the information relevant to your topic?​
  • Who are the authors, are they experts in the field? Who do they work for? What else have they written?​
  • What evidence is given, what references are given, and what methodology is used?​
  • How is the study funded? Is there a bias?​
  • When was the information written, is it still relevant? Has it been updated or amended in light of new evidence?

 

For more information and resources, check out the ‘Evaluating information: additional resources’ box at the bottom of this page.

Plan your search

Before you start searching the databases, it helps to take time to plan your search.

Step 1:  Clearly define the topic or research question

Step 2:  Divide the topic or question into separate key concepts

Step 3:  Select alternative search terms and synonyms for each concept

Step 4:  Consider using text word symbols such as truncation and "phrase searching"

Step 5:  Select search terms to combine using Boolean logic - AND, OR, NOT

Step 6:  Select relevant databases via the Library homepage or your Subject Guide

Step 7:  When searching a database look for subject heading options

Step 8:  Run text word searches to complement subject heading searches

Step 9:  Review the results and modify your search strategy as required

Find an article using Google Scholar

Do you already know what you're looking for?  Try searching Google Scholar for the title of the article.

Follow the Otago Article Links in your result list to find a copy of the article in our databases.

Annual Review of Biochemistry

If the article you need is not online...

Try these options: